News Release | Environment Washington

60.8% of WA schools taps tested have unsafe levels of lead

A new report by Environment Washington found that more than 60 percent of drinking water taps in schools that were tested for lead had elevated levels of lead, above 1 part per billion (ppb). Of the 199 schools and preschools tested, 97 percent had at least one tap where lead was detected at 1 ppb in the water. Recognizing that there is no safe level of lead, especially for children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is urging schools to limit lead in drinking water to 1 part per billion.

News Release | Environment America

Statement: EPA commits to PFAS drinking water standards

Following pressure from lawmakers and groups such as Environment America, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) agreed today to begin setting enforceable drinking water standards on two toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). We commend the EPA for listening to the community, incorporating critical feedback, and responding appropriately to protect our drinking water from PFAS contamination.

News Release | Environment Washington

Students Tour Washington to Support 100% Clean Energy

Students from the WashPIRG Student Chapters are travelling the state to build support for 100% Renewable Energy and the 100% clean electricity bill before the state legislature. Students are stopping in cities, meeting with local leaders and talking to the media about why they support renewable energy and why it’s essential for Washington’s future.

News Release | Environment America

Statement: PFAS management plan falls short

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a “PFAS Management Plan” today that fails to establish drinking water standards for toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).

News Release | Environment America

Clock starts on Dirty Water Rule 60-day comment period

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will publish its proposed replacement for the Clean Water Rule in the Federal Register on Feb. 14, initiating the 60-day public comment period. Considering the Dirty Water Rule would strip federal protections from thousands of waterways across the country, the EPA is giving Americans an astonishingly brief opportunity to speak out on the most sweeping attack on clean water in recent memory.

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