New developments in the race to save the orcas

A coalition has committed to working with the National Marine Fisheries Service to develop a long-term plan to protect salmon runs, which are critical to the Southern Resident orca that feed on them.

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John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.

The odds of winning the race to save the Southern Resident orca could improve soon.
 
On Oct. 21, a coalition of fishing and conservation groups submitted a request to suspend a lawsuit that challenges the federal plan for dam operations on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. If approved, the coalition has committed to working with the National Marine Fisheries Service to develop a long-term plan to protect the rivers’ salmon runs, which are critical to the orca that feed on them.
 
In the interim, federal agencies agreed to a compromise on hydropower operations that would allow juvenile salmon to pass through more quickly during migration. 
 
"Pacific Northwest salmon are a vital part of keeping Washington’s ecosystems healthy," said Mandy Apa, a conservation associate with Environment Washington. "It is exciting to see progress in the discussions around creating a comprehensive long-term solution to help save the salmon that, in turn, will save the orca." 
 

Read more about this development.

Lean more about our Save Our Orcas campaign.

JOIN OUR CALL FOR ACTION

Along with millions of other Washingtonians, we believe that we must do everything in our power to save our orcas. If you agree, you can help by urging our senators to support breaching the Lower Snake River dams to restore the salmon populations that our orcas need to survive and thrive.

Photo: Chinook salmon are 80% of the Southern Resident orca's diet - but there aren't enough to go around. Credit: Tory Kallman via Shutterstock

John Stout
Content Creator

Author: John Stout

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., Pomona College

John creates content for the Environment America state groups. He was previously the transportation advocate for U.S. PIRG and MASSPIRG. John has co-authored multiple reports and numerous op-eds on transportation issues ranging from increased public transit to electrified vehicles to how e-bikes can help us tackle climate change. John lives in Boston with his wife, who works as a nurse at Boston Children's Hospital. They enjoy biking, surfing and eating.