Environment Washington launches Save the Orcas campaign

Just 75 Southern Resident orcas remain on Earth, and scientists warn their numbers will continue to dwindle without intervention.

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Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

Just 75 Southern Resident orcas remain on Earth, and scientists warn their numbers will continue to dwindle without intervention.

Dams on the Lower Snake and Columbia rivers block Chinook salmon, the orcas' main food source, from spawning and returning to the sea, and orcas are starving as a result. On June 16, Environment Washington kicked off its campaign to save them. This summer, staff will mobilize Washingtonians across the state to call on their lawmakers to breach the dams, restore Chinook salmon populations and save the orcas.

“Restoring the lower Snake River is our very best salmon restoration opportunity anywhere on the West Coast," said Environment Washington Acting Director Pam Clough.

"Washington’s leaders care deeply about the fate of our salmon and orca populations, and we’ve launched this grassroots campaign to empower Gov. Jay Inslee and Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell to take swift and bold action for orca and salmon recovery throughout the Northwest."

Read more about the campaign launch.

Learn more about the campaign.

JOIN OUR CALL FOR ACTION

Along with millions of other Washingtonians, we believe that we must do everything in our power to save our orcas. If you agree, you can help by urging our senators to support breaching the Lower Snake River dams to restore the salmon populations that our orcas need to survive and thrive.

Photo: Environment Washington is campaigning to save the Southern Resident orca population, which is at one of the lowest numbers in decades. Credit: Tory Kallman via Shutterstock

Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.