Environment Washington, family testify for Bruce Speight Bill to get lead out of school drinking water

When it comes to protecting school children from lead in their drinking water, Washington gets an F, according to an Environment Washington analysis.

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Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

When it comes to protecting school children from lead in their drinking water, Washington gets an F, according to an Environment Washington analysis.

On Jan. 26, Environment Washington's Pam Clough joined the Speight family to testify on behalf of the Bruce Speight Bill, which addresses lead contamination in school drinking water. Environment Washington is working to advance the bill that would limit the amount of lead in drinking water to 5 parts per billion and honors the work of Bruce, who served as our state director until his passing in 2019. 

“In 2021, many kids will be returning to in-person learning, but unfortunately, this means they may face another public health threat: lead in school drinking water,” said Pam. “It’s time we stop failing Washington's kids and get the lead out of school drinking water.”

Pam added, “It’s especially heartening to see this bill moving forward, in large part because of Bruce’s work.”

Read more about the bill.

Learn more about our Get the Lead Out campaign. 

 

 

Get the Lead Out

There is lead-tainted water in schools and pre-schools across the country, flowing from fountains and faucets where our kids drink water every day. 

Join us in urging the governor to get the lead out of school drinking water.

Photo: Environment Washington State Director Pam Clough testified as the group advocates for even more stringent standards, because there’s no safe level of lead. Credit: TVW

 

Mary Katherine Moore
Content Creator

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Content Creator

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.