Result

Environmental defense programs preserved

Key environmental programs were saved from the chopping block in 2010 with help from Environment Washington and coalition partners like the Washington Environment Council. After we spoke out, the Legislature restored more than $70 million in funding to clean up areas contaminated with toxic chemicals; monitor and reduce pollution in our air; prevent pollution of our waterways, and more.

Result

A $50 million down-payment on stormwater solution

In April 2010, the state Legislature approved $50 million in funding for projects to stem the flow of chemicals, petroleum and other waste into our waters. The victory came after our staff and supporters attended hearings, cosponsored a “citizen lobby day,” organized phone banks, and helped bring together local activists, business owners and shellfish farmers.

Result

No more wasted phone books

A measure we helped pass in 2010 could keep more than 2,000 tons of paper out of Seattle’s waste stream annually and save the city $350,000 -- simply by allowing Seattlites to opt out of receiving printed phone books if they wish. To make our case, we met with city councilmembers, provided testimony at hearings, and mobilized business owners and the public to speak out.

Result

Defending untrammeled wilderness

After our 2009 report, “Quietly Paving Paradise,” sounded the alarm about irresponsible development in our national forests, then-Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack called a time-out on new plans to build roads within Olympic, Mount Baker-Snoqalmie and all of our national forests. We’re still fighting to win permanent protections.

Result

Plastic bag ban movement growing quickly

By summer 2012, we'd helped citizens in Bainbridge Island, Bellingham, Mukilteo, Port Townsend and Seattle join Edmonds in banning disposable plastic bags. Local bag bans  make an immediate impact to cut plastic pollution in Puget Sound while building the momentum necessary to ban the bags statewide.

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