Washington's natural treasures

Places like Mount Rainier National Park and Lake Quinault in the Olympics are some of the most amazing places in the country, and a big part of what makes living in Washington so great. They’re where we go to hike, camp and enjoy the outdoors with family and friends. They’re treasured destinations and key parts of our natural heritage.

Mount Rainier, Olympics at risk

Yet instead of helping protect and preserve these places for future generations, some shortsighted leaders in Congress want to eliminate funding for our most successful open space program, the Land and Water Conservation Fund. If they get their way, the program could even expire next year, a move that would leave our best places with less protection against pollution, logging and overdevelopment. These places deserve better. It’s up to us to protect them for our kids and future generations.

We can protect our parks

When Congress shut down our national parks last fall, millions of Americans raised their voices and forced Washington, D.C., to reopen them. It’s time to stand up for the places we love again—before we see more damage done to the most beautiful parts of our state.

Environment Washington is bringing people together to urge our senators to make preserving special places a top priority. By standing up to anti-environment members of Congress, our senators can leave a lasting legacy for Washington.

Together, we can win

If enough of us speak out, we can protect the best places in Washington by stopping Congress from slashing their funding. 

Members and supporters like you make it possible for our staff to conduct research, make our case to the media, testify in Olympia and in Washington, D.C., and build the grassroots support necessary to protect the places we love. 

Issue updates

Blog Post

20 Day Left to Act for Land and Water Conservation Fund | John Rumpler

Washington boasts a multitude of iconic parks and wilderness areas, helping it live up to the well-deserved nickname of the Evergreen State. It’s difficult to imagine Washington without Mt. Rainier, the Alpine Lakes Wilderness, or name your favorite neighborhood park. Mine include Discovery Park and Gas Works.  While we take the beauty and serenity these places have to offer for granted, in reality, they wouldn’t exist without a federal program called the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which expires on September 30, 2015, unless Congress acts.

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News Release | Environment Washington

Environment Washington Endorses Candidates for 2014 Elections

Environment Washington, a statewide environmental organization, announced today the endorsement of three candidates for federal office in the 2014 elections.

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News Release | Environment Washington

Olympic National Park and Mt. Rainier National Park are Underfunded, Under Threat

As Congress approaches another deadline on the federal budget, a new Environment Washington Research & Policy Center analysis, entitled Death by a Thousand Cuts, exposes the challenges facing Olympic National Park and Mt. Rainier National Park as a result of mounting funding cuts to the National Park Service.

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News Release | Environment Washington

Administration, Businesses, and Public Celebrate San Juan Islands

Yesterday, elected officials, conservation groups, business leaders, and community members celebrated Washington’s newest national monument, the San Juan Islands National Monument. The monument will permanently protect close to 1,000 acres of land in the San Juans, on Monday with the designation of the San Juan Islands National Monument. The region, which will continue to be managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), encompasses nesting grounds for bald eagles, shorelines where visitors can spot passing seals and orcas, and stands of old growth forest.

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News Release | Environment Washington

President Obama Protects Islands within the San Juans

President Obama is expected to permanently protected close to 1,000 acres of land in the San Juans, on Monday with the designation of the San Juan Islands National Monument. The region, which will continue to be managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), encompasses nesting grounds for bald eagles, shorelines where visitors can spot passing seals and orcas, and stands of old growth forest.

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