News Release | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Ten Years of Progress Positions Washington State to Take Renewable Energy to the Next Level

Since 2007, Washington State has seen a 17,588 percent increase in the amount of electricity it gets from the sun and a 330 percent increase in wind energy production, according to a new report released today by Environment Washington Research and Policy Center. The report also highlights advances in the use of energy storage and electric vehicles that will help catalyze the clean energy revolution in Washington. Emerging as a leader in some categories, Washington ranked 3rd for number of electric vehicles sold and 10th for improvements in electricity energy efficiency programs.

News Release | Environment America

House Bill Would Shift America Entirely to Clean Energy By 2050

Today, Representatives Jared Polis (CO), Jared Huffman (CA), Raul Grijalva (AZ) and Pramila Jayapal (WA) introduced a bill to phase out fossil fuels and completely replace them with clean, renewable energy by 2050.

News Release | Environment Washington

New State Provision Addresses Lead in School Drinking Water

Environment Washington and WashPIRG hailed a new provision in the state’s budget that directs the Department of Health (DOH) to develop guidance for schools to take action whenever lead in water exceeds 1 part per billion.

News Release | Environment Washington

Proposed Clean Water Rule Repeal Risks Drinking Water for More Than 2 Million Washingtonians

On June 27, 2017, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Scott Pruitt proposed repealing the Clean Water Rule, which restored federal protections to half our nation’s streams and thousands of wetlands across the country. Bruce Speight, Environment Washington Director, issued the following statement:

News Release | Environment Washington

Hotter Summers Coming to Washington

Environment Washington marked the first day of summer by urging leaders at all levels of government to tackle climate change. According to scientists at Climate Central, global warming pollution will fuel even hotter summers in the future. Summer temperatures in Washington are already 1.1 degrees hotter now, on average, than in the 1970s. Without action to eliminate global warming pollution, summer temperatures here in Washington could rise by 10.75 degrees by the end of the century. That would make summer days in Seattle feel more like they do now in Placentia, CA.

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