Updates

Keystone XL approval is wrong direction

By facilitating the transportation of dirty tar sands fuels, Keystone would add 27.4 million metric tons of global warming pollution to our atmosphere per year. President Trump's executive order advancing the Keystone XL pipeline is definitely a step in the wrong direction. READ MORE.

News Release | Environment Washington

Report: As solar explodes nationwide, Washington falls, lags behind most other states

With one solar panel in the state for every 28 people, Washington is falling behind a majority of states in an annual ranking of solar power capacity, despite having the technical potential to produce 21 times as much electricity from solar power as the state consumes each year. In this year’s ranking, Washington dropped to 27th in total solar capacity and 30th in total solar capacity per capita, after ranking 25th in both categories last year.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Washington

Tell Ecology to Protect Our Drinking Water from Harmful Manure Pollution

Every day industrial dairy operations in Washington State generate millions of pounds of manure.  With your help, we can make sure Washington’s waterways and drinking water supplies are protected from harmful manure pollution.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

River otter, today’s your special day | Russell Bassett

It’s International River Otter Awareness Day! Here are five reasons we appreciate these amazing creatures.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post

We are asking for big change | Katie Hammer

Global warming is taking its toll on people and the environment around the world. Here in the U.S., we see more extreme weather like heat waves, droughts, floods, and bad air days because of global warming. We know that to avoid catastrophe and meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement, the US will need to cut overall global warming pollution by more than 80 percent by mid-century.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

A New Way Forward

America has made progress in cutting pollution from cars and trucks over the last decade as a result of improved vehicle fuel economy and slower growth in driving. But eliminating greenhouse gas emissions from our urban transportation systems is going to require more than incremental change – it will require transformation. 

> Keep Reading

Pages