Updates

Report drew leaders' attention to plastic pollution.

Our report, “Keeping Plastic Out of Puget Sound,” detailed the damage caused by plastic pollution and noted that local and national governments worldwide are taking action to ban the bags. We had the lead quote in a front page Seattle Times article on this issue, grabbing the attention of city and state leaders. We need your help to turn a statewide bag ban from great idea into reality. 

Headline

Seattle considers plastic bag ban

A Washington state lawmaker says he is considering a measure next year that would either ban plastic bags statewide or create a uniform ordinance that cities could use if they choose to restrict them.

> Keep Reading
Headline

Like plastic bags? Hate 'em? Let the Seattle Council know tonight

The Seattle City Council is considering a ban on thin single-use plastic bags at checkout stands. The ban will also include a pass-through fee of 5 cents for paper bags.

> Keep Reading
Headline

Ban plastic bags in Seattle? Fight heats up

A gray whale that washed up on a Puget Sound beach last year has become Exhibit A in the debate over whether to ban plastic bags in Seattle. Environmentalists point to the contents of the dead whale's stomach, itemized in a necropsy, as a compelling argument that the thin-film carryout shopping bags should be outlawed. The inedible trash that the whale had ingested included sweatpants, a golf ball, surgical gloves, small towels and more than 20 plastic bags.

 

> Keep Reading
Headline

Plastic bag ban back on Seattle council's agenda

"We all remember the beached grey whale found dead in West Seattle last year with 20 plastic bags in its stomach," O'Brian said in a press release. "The problem plastics pose for the Sound and ocean is pervasive and alarming."

> Keep Reading
Headline

Seattle's new motto: In banning plastic bags, look to Bellingham

Some environmental activists see bans like the ones in Bellingham and Edmonds as bringing more benefits than the more nuanced approach Seattle tried originally. Certainly, to the public, a ban may sound more reasonable.

> Keep Reading

Pages